Venue & Hospitality

Conference Dates: May 11-12, 2020

Hotel Services & Amenities

  • Audio/Visual Equipment Rental.
  • Business Center.
  • Business Phone Service.
  • Complimentary Printing Service.
  • Express Mail.
  • Fax.
  • Meeting Rooms.
  • Office Rental.
  • Photo Copying Service.
  • Secretarial Service.
  • Telex.
  • Typewriter.
  • Video Conference.
  • Video Messaging.
  • Video Phone.
  • ATM.
  • Baggage Storage.

Transportation

About City

Tourist:

Tourism in Frankfurt is a major income source. In 2018, 10.15 million tourists visited the city. The top reasons to come are sightseeing, shopping and business. It has the busiest airport in the country. The city is the largest Airbnb market in the world.  In addition to its infrastructure and economy, its diversity supports a vibrant cultural scene. The Hotels in central Frankfurt offer 34,000 beds in 228 hotels, of which 13 are luxury hotels and 46 are first-class hotels. Top sights: The Römerberg, The Museum District, The Palm Garden, Senckenberg Natural History Museum, St. Bartholomew's Cathedral, Kleine Markthalle, Goethe House and Museum, The Hauptwache, Art City: The Frankfurt Museum of Modern Art, Zoo Frankfurt, The Old Opera House, The Eschenheimer Tower etc.

Frankfurt, a central German city on the river Main, is a major financial hub that's home to the European Central Bank. It's the birthplace of famed writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, whose former home is now the Goethe House Museum. Like much of the city, it was damaged during World War II and later rebuilt. The reconstructed Altstadt (Old Town) is the site of Römerberg, a square that hosts an annual Christmas market.

Frankfurt was a city state, the Free City of Frankfurt, for nearly five centuries, and was one of the most important cities of the Holy Roman Empire, as a site of imperial coronations; it lost its sovereignty upon the collapse of the empire in 1806 and then permanently in 1866, when it was annexed by the Kingdom of Prussia. It has been part of the federal state of Hesse since 1945. A quarter of the population are foreign nationals, including many expatriates.

Frankfurt is an alpha world city and a global hub for commerce, culture, education, tourism and transportation. It is the site of many global and European corporate headquarters. Frankfurt Airport is among the world's busiest. Frankfurt is the major financial centre of the European continent, with the headquarters of the European Central Bank, German Federal Bank, Frankfurt Stock Exchange, Deutsche Bank, DZ Bank, KfW, Commerzbank, several cloud and fintech startups and other institutes. Automotive, technology and research, services, consulting, media and creative industries complement the economic base. Frankfurt's DE-CIX is the world's largest internet exchange point. Messe Frankfurt is one of the world's largest trade fairs. Major fairs include the Frankfurt Motor Show, the world's largest motor show, the Music Fair, and the Frankfurt Book Fair, the world's largest book fair.

See list of tourist attractions in Frankfurt.

The Römerberg: Frankfurt's Old Town Center

In the heart of Frankfurt's Old Town (Altstadt), the Römerberg is an irregularly shaped square with the Justice Fountain (Gerechtigkeitsbrunnen) at its center. It is the city's busiest pedestrian zone and home to numerous tourist attractions and it has many open-fronted shops, once common throughout the old town, and the Römer, with its 11 lovely buildings, faithfully reconstructed in 1954 from original 15th- to 18th-century floor plans. The historic Wertheim House survived the 1944 air raids that destroyed much of old Frankfurt.

The area also includes the Old Town Hall (Altes Rathaus), with its Imperial Hall (Kaisersaal), once the scene of splendid banquets, and other notable buildings include the New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus) from 1908; the 14th-century Gothic Church of St. Leonhard; and St. Nicholas Church, with its carillon. Also of interest here is the Historical Museum (Historisches Museum), founded in 1878, with its collections related to Frankfurt's rich cultural history from medieval to modern times, and the six traditional-style buildings of the Ostzeile.

The Museum District

Frankfurt's Museum District (Museumsufer), on the south bank of the River Main, is a first-rate collection of separate museums, many of them of international standing. Highlights include the Museum of World Cultures (Museum der Weltkulturen), regarded as one of Europe's top ethnological museums. Founded in 1904, its collections include more than 65,000 artifacts from as far afield as Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

The Palm Garden

On the Bockenheimer Landstrasse is the beautiful 54-acre Palm Garden (Palmengarten), the largest botanic garden in Germany. An instant hit with the public upon its opening in 1871, it attracted some of the top performers from around the world, including Buffalo Bill, who visited with his Wild West show in 1890. Highlights are outdoor botanical exhibits laid out according to their geographical location, along with a number of greenhouses containing subtropical and tropical plant species. The gardens also offer boating, a children's playground, and picnic spots. From Palmengarten, the Europaturm - a telecommunications tower also known as the Tower of Europe - is just a short walk away, and worth visiting for its viewing platform and restaurant.

Senckenberg Natural History Museum

In Frankfurt's Senckenberg Gardens, the Senckenberg Natural History Museum (Naturmuseum Senckenberg) is one of the most modern museums of natural history in Europe, and the second largest of its kind in Germany. Along with its numerous displays relating to our planet's biodiversity and the evolution of organisms, the museum houses Europe's biggest exhibition of large dinosaurs, making it particularly popular with families (a number of life-size replica dinosaurs greet guests in the museum's forecourt). It's also home to the world's largest collection of stuffed birds, along with an extensive exhibit outlining the development of mankind. English language tours are available, and you can rent audio guides.

St. Bartholomew's Cathedral

Roman Catholic St. Bartholomew's Cathedral (Frankfurter Dom, or Dom St. Bartholomäus) was built of red sandstone in Gothic style between the 13th and 15th centuries, and at 95 meters, still manages to stand out in this city of skyscrapers. One of only a handful of churches in Germany to be designated as an Imperial Cathedral, it was here from 1562 to 1792 that the coronation of Emperors took place in the Election Chapel. Beneath the tower is the magnificent Crucifixion by Hans Backoffen, sculpted in 1509, while in the Marienkapelle is the Maria-Schlaf-Altar from 1434.

Goethe House and Museum

Frankfurt was the birthplace of Germany's greatest writer, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. His family home, Goethe House, where Goethe was born on August 28, 1749 and lived until 1765, shows how the well-to-do family and their staff would have lived. You can see everything from the sumptuously decorated dining room on the main floor to Goethe's writing room on the top floor, where he penned many of his early works and where he played as a child with his puppet theater. Next-door is the Goethe Museum, a 14-room gallery showcasing artworks from the writer's time, including masterpieces of the Late Baroque and Romantic periods. (Family guided tours of both properties are available.) Other Frankfurt attractions that testify to the writer's fame are the Goethe Tower, a 43-meter-tall wooden structure offering superb views of the city, and Goethestrasse, a high-end shopping area with many fine boutiques, art galleries, and cafés.

The Hauptwache

In the middle of the city and one of Frankfurt's busiest pedestrian areas, the Hauptwache - literally translated, the Main Guard - is famous for its mix of fine historic buildings and modern structures. The most notable building here is the old Baroque Guard House after which the square is named. Built in 1730, it once housed the city's militia, a prison, and later, a police station, and now serves as a café. The square itself is one of Frankfurt's main shopping areas, complete with a large underground mall. It's also the point from which the city's main shopping and commercial streets radiate. Pedestrian-friendly Zeil heads east, and Kaiserstrasse, with many places of entertainment in its side streets, runs southwest past the Rossmarkt and Kaiserplatz to the Hauptbahnhof. This is the city's main train station, built in 1888 and one of the largest stations in Europe.

Art City: The Frankfurt Museum of Modern Art

The Frankfurt Museum of Modern Art (MMK Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt) is widely regarded as one of Europe's most important galleries of contemporary art. Opened in 1991 in a stunning post-modern building in the heart of the city, the museum includes in its vast collection some 5,000 fine examples from more than 450 leading artists. Spanning from the 1960s to the present, works are by artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Francis Bacon. The museum also operates MMK Zollamt, a satellite exhibition space featuring works by younger and as yet unknown artists; the Frankfurt Museum of Applied Art (Museum für angewandte Kunst), with more than 30,000 items of European and Asian applied art, including furniture, tapestries, glass, ceramics and books; and Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, showing both modern and contemporary art.

Zoo Frankfurt

Home to more than 4,500 animals representing at least 450 different species, Zoo Frankfurt covers 32 acres near the city's old Friedberger Tor. Founded in 1858, it's Germany's second oldest zoo and is noted for its excellent animal houses, including the unique Grzimek House with displays of Madagascar's diverse fauna. Also of interest is the Exotarium, with animals from different climatic regions, including marine life, reptiles, and crocodiles. The Borgori Forest has a superb ape house in an authentic jungle setting. Other highlights include the Nocturnal Animals House and the Bird Hall. A variety of events and programs are offered, including family festivals, exhibits, and themed tours.

The Old Opera House

In the heart of Frankfurt's Opera Square (Opernplatz), the Old Opera House (Alte Oper) was constructed in 1880 in the style of the Italian High Renaissance. Destroyed during World War II, it was rebuilt and reopened in 1981 as one of the city's most important concert venues. The city's new opera house, Oper Frankfurt, and the drama theater, Schauspiel Frankfurt, share a contemporary, state-of-the-art venue known as Opern-und Schauspielhaus Frankfurt, about half a mile away on Willy-Brandt-Platz, near the river.

The Eschenheimer Tower

The Eschenheimer Tower (Turm), built in the early 1400s, remains the finest relic from Frankfurt's old town walls. At 47 meters high, it still impresses with its dimensions and dominates the Eschenheimer Gate district. Today, the tower houses a café and meeting rooms used by local historical societies. Also of interest is the nearby Stock Exchange, built in 1879 and the largest in the country.

 

Attractions & Landmarks

    Attractions & Lanadmarks are Updating Soon...

City Highlights